Temper Indigo: Brooklyn Artists Wayne Pate and Stephen Antonson Crew Up on a Sequence of Blue-and-White Urns

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Temper Indigo: Brooklyn Artists Wayne Pate and Stephen Antonson Crew Up on a Sequence of Blue-and-White Urns
Temper Indigo: Brooklyn Artists Wayne Pate and Stephen Antonson Crew Up on a Sequence of Blue-and-White Urns

“It’s clearly a psychological thing,” muses artist Wayne Pate when requested to explain the emotional, very actual, but one way or the other hard-to-put-into-words attraction of blue and white. This basic—even historic—mixture has lengthy been beloved by decorators, textile artists, and ceramists, and it’s one which Pate gave a rethink when he teamed up with Stephen Antonson, a plaster artist and fellow Brooklynite (whom he met by way of Instagram), to create a sequence of one-off urns.

Pate describes this joint mission, which was a few yr within the making, as “an organic process that took on a life of its own.” The pair tweaked an current Antonson design, and Pate painted immediately on it utilizing acrylics. “I wanted to have a common thread running throughout all the pieces,” explains the artist, who landed on blue and white, a mix he’s lengthy liked. “I needed to play on the entire conventional chinoise/delftware factor by doing my very own motifs, that are positively extra daring and graphic.” To not point out enormously in demand.

The urn mission follows the debut, in February, of a group of Pate-designed wallpapers and textiles for Studio 4 NYC. The artist has additionally created prints for Whit and for his spouse Rebecca Taylor’s La Vie line. Pate’s aesthetic is a colourful, cheering one, knowledgeable by sources like Henri Matisse and Bloomsbury, that are reworked as they’re filtered by the “antique flea market”—as Pate places it—of his thoughts. Fascinating and trendy, the artist’s work appears to keep up a playful dialogue with the previous—one which would definitely be thrilling to eavesdrop in on. “Why do things have to be so fleeting all the time?” wonders Pate. “I love using traditional themes and motifs that people understand the history and origins of, and I love to just put my own twist on them.”